A large portion of Amudim‘s calls are from parents seeking guidance and referrals for their kids. One of our case managers recently received an uncommon call from a parent reaching out for some much needed help. Mrs. Janis Wheeler*, an elderly woman, called in distress over her 50 year-old son, Adam*. Adam had recently moved in with his mother after decades of failed relationships, schooling and employment. Mrs. Wheeler was unsure of how to parent her middle-aged son, set boundaries, and most importantly, how to support him and ensure her own peace of mind through this difficult time.

After some careful questioning, it became clear that this man was suffering from chronic depression and high levels of social anxiety. This had hindered his countless attempts to create a productive life for himself. His ensuing low self-esteem had Adam perceiving any attempt to get help as an attack; he became surly and defensive when any of his friends or family tried to intercede. Mrs. Wheeler had reached a point of frustration and resentment that she could no longer ignore.

Amudim’s case manager listened, validated the hardship, and praised Mrs. Wheeler for reaching out. Our case manager worked tirelessly to help Mrs. Wheeler understand Adam’s plight. When she recognized the self-defeating patterns that were crippling her son, Mrs. Wheeler was able to transition from a place of criticism to compassion. Our case manager provided Mrs. Wheeler with language to connect to Adam and communicate with him more effectively.

After a few positive conversations with his mother, Adam tentatively reached out to the Amudim case manager. She helped Adam move from a place of despair to hope, and built a customized treatment plan including weekly therapy, a support group, career counseling and a psychiatry appointment.

We will continue to follow up with Adam and his mother, and with time and hard work, they will hopefully see positive changes in his life and their relationship. Our concern for our children doesn’t end when they turn eighteen; if someone you know of any age is struggling, please do not hesitate to call us: (646) 517-0222. We are here to help.

*Details have been changed for privacy purposes.